De Blasio tells Weiner to leave NYC’s mayoral race

 
Democratic mayoral candidates participate in first debate for the city's top job.

Democratic mayoral candidates participate in first debate for the city’s top job.

By Carmen Glover

New York: All five Democratic mayoral candidates in New York City participated in the first debate in the election cycle during a session which aired on WABC Channel 7 at 7:00 pm last night. Bill Ritter did his best to keep the debate flowing smoothly despite the attempts by a wayward Anthony Weiner to dominate the show by repeating his view that his “independence” makes him the best choice for the electorate. Weiner touted his independence in response to most of the questions posed, including the sexting scandal that has overshadowed his mayoral bid. While some of the candidates refused to share their views about Weiner’s presence in the race, Pubic Advocate Bill de Blasio had no such qualms.

“Anthony Weiner should step aside for the good of the city,” he said firmly. City Controller John Liu shook off a tentative, unsteady start to make a few noteworthy points about his campaign’s platform but it seemed as if Public Advocate Bill de Blasio was the most polished and credible candidate in the race. City Council Speaker Christine Quinn gave the same stock answer for almost every question, while former City Controller William Thompson seemed knowledgeable and passionate.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn and Anthony Weiner are combative during the debate.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn and Anthony Weiner are combative during the debate.

The debate covered the usual topics: Immigration, the economy, the educational system, stop and frisk, a topic for which they were all prepared. “Too many people are being stopped who did nothing wrong,” said Weiner, while Liu called for “community policing.” Thompson did not mince words on the issue. “We have to make sure our city is safe but we don’t have to sacrifice our constitutional rights to get it done,” he said. De Blasio suggested having “an independent inspector general and a new police commissioner.” All of the male candidates said that if elected, they would find a new police commissioner but Quinn was staunch in her support of Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, praising his achievements.  Williams praised Kelly modestly before delivering one of the harshest assessments on the commissioner’s role in the stop and frisk debacle plaguing the city. “Ray Kelly has done good things for the city of New York,” Williams said, “but he’s also become the face of an abusive stop and frisk policy that targets Blacks and Latinos in the city of New York.’

All of the candidates decried the abysmal statewide test scores of public school students who took tests in the spring in preparation for the Common Core standards. According to results released recently, a mere third of the students passed the tests.  Although Quinn said schools should be “closed when necessary,” the men all advocated giving schools additional resources to excel as a better alternative. “Give schools additional support,” Thompson said. “I support a moratorium on closing schools” de Blasio stated. It was on the issue of jobs that all five candidates seemed to be most animated. “Let big companies pay their fair share and give small businesses a tax break to spur economic development,” Liu suggested. Agreeing, de Blasio said “Take sustainability away from big companies and provide it to CUNY for job training.” Williams agreed with job training while Quinn boated about her “record or results.”  The debate was co-sponsored by the Daily News, WABC/Channel 7, the League of Women Voters and Noticias 41 Univision.  –OnPointPress.net

 

 

 

 

NABJ13 in Orlando was a mixture of fun, networking and information

 

OnPointPress.net Editorial Director Carmen Glover interacts with CNN Anchor Don Lemon at the  Awards Gala.

OnPointPress.net Editorial Director Carmen Glover interacts with CNN Anchor Don Lemon at the Awards Gala.

By Carmen Glover

For years I have mulled over the idea of attending the NABJ Convention and Career Fair but something always came up, pushing the thought into the deep recesses of my mind. But this year was different and I am very happy that I decided to attend the convention in Orlando, Florida from July 31, to August 4, 2013. During the opening night ceremony, New York’s Chapter won professional chapter of the year and Syracuse University won student chapter of the year. Afterwards, we enjoyed a spectacular presentation and block party at Disney’s Hollywood Studios, replete with tasty dishes, lively music and a special Disney show.

OnPointPress Editorial Director Carmen Glover is flanked by Billy Blanks Jr and his wife Sharon after winning raffle.

OnPointPress Editorial Director Carmen Glover is flanked by Billy Blanks Jr and his wife Sharon after winning raffle.

The next morning, I staggered out of bed to participate in the workout session led by Billy Blanks Jr. and his wife Sharon. However, after surviving the grueling hour-long exercise routine, I nearly fainted from shock when I won a raffle held for workout participants. I also enjoyed a delicious mango/pineapple smoothie, courtesy of the McDonald’s booth. Later in the week, I stopped by the Healthy Pavilion to have my Body Mass Index (BMI) read and get dietary tips.

Throughout the four-day convention and career fair, I attended various seminars, met new friends, re-connected with longtime colleagues and had a good time. Among the most compelling sessions were “Conversation with Civil Rights Legend Simeon Booker”; Prudential’s “Cultivating Personal Wealth” moderated by Sharon Epperson of CNBC and featuring panelists such as Ivory Johnson, founder of Delancey Wealth Management, LLC, Michelle Singletary of the Washington Post and LaToya Smith of Black Enterprise; “Talking Heads 2.0” featuring Michael Smith and Jemele Hill of ESPN’s Numbers Never Lie, Arianne Thompson of USA Today and moderated by entertainment reporter Kelley Carter;  “Ethics in Media,” moderated by Randall Pinkston and featuring Trayvon Martin’s parents, “The “Branding of You,” moderated by former NABJ President Will Sutton and featuring Herb Lowe of Marquette University and Paula Madison of Madison Media Management LLC and “A Look at the Future of Magazines,” moderated by Yanick Rice Lamb of Howard University, with panelists including Vanessa Bush, editor-in-chief of Essence, Adrienne Samuels Gibbs, senior editor of Ebony and Keith Reed, senior editor of ESPN the Magazine/Treasurer NABJ.

Adrienne Samuels Gibbs of Ebony, Vanessa Bush of Essence and Keith Reed of ESPN The Magazine discuss the future of magazines.

Adrienne Samuels Gibbs of Ebony, Vanessa Bush of Essence and Keith Reed of ESPN The Magazine discuss the future of magazines.

I especially enjoyed the Awards Gala and the Sunday Gospel Brunch because both events made it easy for attendees to interact, and had great hosts: Don Lemon of CNN and Cari Champion of ESPN for the former and Syan Roberts of WESH-TV and Rod Carter of WFLA-TV for the latter.  It was also interesting observing folks swarming around singer Tyrese at the screening of the upcoming movie Black Nativity. The screening of the film, 12 Years a Slave was poignant while subsequent discussion with its stars Alfre Woodard, Lupita Nyong’o and the film’s director, Steve McQueen, was enlightening. During the Sports Task Force Scholarship Jam at the House of Blues, Hugh Douglas had unflattering words for his Numbers Never Lie co-host Michael Smith.

Bob Butler was voted the new NABJ President at the event.

Bob Butler was voted the new NABJ President at the event.

Bob Butler, who participated in the workout session, became the newest NABJ President, in an election that had an alarmingly low participation rate of less that 45% of the overall membership. Tv One’s Roland Martin was named journalist of the year and Gregory L. Moore of the Denver Post received the Lifetime Achievement Award and Disney’s Carmen J. Smith accepted Dr. Shelley Stewart’s Community Service Award on his behalf. Several of the moderators listed in the journal were no shows at the convention but the events went on smoothly. I left the convention loving the world of journalism even more, while being concerned by the changes looming on the horizon for print journalism. See you in Boston next year!  –OnPointPress.net.