Across the USA, residents unite to honor victims of police brutality

Highway Patrol chief Ron Johnson eased tensions among the protesters in Ferguson, Missouri.

Highway Patrol chief Ron Johnson eased tensions among the protesters in Ferguson, Missouri.

By Carmen Glover

Across the United States residents gathered to peacefully protest police brutality in a National Moment of Silence on August 14 at 7:00 p.m.‎ Below are images from select cities.

#NMOS14 at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

#NMOS14 at Howard University in Washington, D.C.

The NMOS14 campaign was organized via social media and quickly gathered steam.

#NMOS14 at Union Square in New York City.

#NMOS14 at Union Square in New York City.

Among the many names invoked at various NMOS14 events were Michael Brown, the unarmed 18-year-old murdered by an unnamed police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, which has sparked nationwide protests; Romarley Marley, Eric Garner, Sean Bell, Anthony Baez and Amadou Diallo who were unarmed when they were killed by police officers in New York City; Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teenager who was killed by overzealous neighborhood watchman George Zimmerman in Florida and Oscar Grant, a 22-year-old father who was killed on New Year’s Eve in Oakland, California, inspiring the award-winning movie “Fruitvale Station.”

#NMOS14 in Houston, Texas

#NMOS14 in Houston, Texas

The NMOS14 protesters came together after President Barack Obama took a break from his vacation to address the nation about Brown’s murder and the ongoing clashes between police and protesters in Ferguson, Missouri. US Attorney General Eric Holder also released a statement expressing concern about the situation in Ferguson. Shortly afterwards, Missouri Governor Jay Nixon held a press conference with county executive Charlie Dooley and Captain Ron Johnson, both African-Americans, at his side.

Unarmed 18-year-old teenager Michael Brown was murdered in Ferguson, Missouri on Saturday, August, sparking uproar and riots.

Unarmed 18-year-old teenager Michael Brown was murdered in Ferguson, Missouri on Saturday, August, sparking uproar and riots.

During the press conference, Nixon announced that he spoke to both President Obama and Attorney General Holder and that he was placing Ferguson’s security in the hands of the Highway Patrol, under Captain Johnson’s leadership. Johnson informed the gathering that he “grew up in Ferguson” while Dooley siad he was “saddened” by what he has seen since Brown’s death. Johnson walked with the protesters, talked to them and the media, and soothed the anger that had erupted when the Ferguson police force deployed officers in riot gear, SWAT teams, tear gas and military weapons to intimidate, harass, bully, beat and arrest the residents and media.-OnPointPress.net.

After US Attorney General issues statement MI Gov places highway patrol in charge of security

US Attorney General Eric Holder issues statement on Unrest in Ferguson , prompting MI Governor to place the Missouri Highway Patrol in charge of security.

US Attorney General Eric Holder issues statement on Unrest in Ferguson , prompting MI Governor to place the Missouri Highway Patrol in charge of security.

US Attorney General Eric Holder released a statement about the protests in Ferguson, Missouri. Read the full statement below:

“This morning, I met with President Obama to discuss the events in Ferguson, Missouri. Like the President, I extend my heartfelt condolences to the family of Michael Brown. While his death has understandably caused heartache within the community, it is clear that the scenes playing out in the streets of Ferguson over the last several nights cannot continue.

For one thing, while the vast majority of protests have been peaceful, acts of violence by members of the public cannot be condoned. Looting and willful efforts to antagonize law enforcement officers who are genuinely trying to protect the public do nothing to remember the young man who has died. Such conduct is unacceptable and must be unequivocally condemned.

By the same token, the law enforcement response to these demonstrations must seek to reduce tensions, not heighten them. Those who peacefully gather to express sympathy for the family of Michael Brown must have their rights respected at all times. And journalists must not be harassed or prevented from covering a story that needs to be told.

At a time when we must seek to rebuild trust between law enforcement and the local community, I am deeply concerned that the deployment of military equipment and vehicles sends a conflicting message. At my direction, Department officials have conveyed these concerns to local authorities. Also at my direction, the Department is offering – through our COPS office and Office of Justice Programs – technical assistance to local authorities in order to help conduct crowd control and maintain public safety without relying on unnecessarily extreme displays of force. The local authorities in Missouri have accepted this offer of assistance as of this afternoon.

Department officials from the Community Relations Service are also on the ground in Missouri to help convene law enforcement officials and civic and faith leaders to plot out steps to reduce tensions in the community. The latest such meeting was convened in Ferguson as recently as this morning. Over time, these conversations should consider the role that increased diversity in law enforcement can play in helping to build trust within communities.

All the while, the federal civil rights investigation into the shooting incident itself continues, in parallel with the local investigation into state law violations. Our investigators from the Civil Rights Division and U.S. attorney’s office in Missouri have already conducted interviews with eyewitnesses on the scene at the time of the shooting incident on Saturday. Our review will take time to conduct, but it will be thorough and fair.”-OnPointPress.net