Walt Disney’s Carole Munroe receives NABJ’s Patricia L. Tobin Media Professional Award

Carole Monroe

Carole Munroe, director of public relations for Walt Disney World Resort is the recipient of the 2015 National Association of Black Journalists’ (NABJ’s) Patricia L. Tobin Media Professional Award.

WASHINGTON (May 22, 2015) − The Board of Directors of The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) has selected Carole Munroe, director of public relations for the Walt Disney World Resort, as the recipient of the 2015 Patricia L. Tobin Media Professional Award. Recipients of the Pat Tobin Award must be entrepreneurs, public relations, advertising, or marketing professionals, or media owners who serve as trailblazers and bridge builders for other media professionals thus improving the media profession at large.

“Carole Munroe is a skilled public relations practitioner. She has a strategic mind, business savvy, combined with a clear and confident style of communication,” said NABJ President Bob Butler. “As the public relations lead for Disney theme parks she helps a global audience understand how special Disney’s parks are and the amazing experiences they offer to visitors from around the world.”

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Munroe’s career with Disney spans 25 years. As director of public relations for the Walt Disney World Resort, she is the site leader for all domestic, international and multi-cultural public relations opportunities impacting the entire destination, which includes four Walt Disney World theme parks, 25 owned and operated resort hotels, two water parks, two full-service spas, the ESPN Wide World of Sports facilities and Downtown Disney (Disney Springs) entertainment, dining and retail complex. Munroe and her team also support other Disney Destinations businesses such as Disney Cruise Line, Adventures By Disney, Disney Vacation Club and Disney’s Fairytale Weddings.

“Carole Munroe is an extraordinary representative for Disney and she works hard on behalf of Disney theme parks, the company’s initiatives, and the brand at large” said Dawn A. Roberts, associate member representative. “An active member of the association she has leveraged her relationships to ensure that Disney is a committed partner to NABJ.”

Munroe is respected as a public relations, brand and marketing strategist. She frequently speaks before public relations and marketing professionals. EBONY Magazine has recognized her as an Outstanding Woman in Marketing and Communications. Her work with Disney Parks has also been honored with a Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) Bronze Anvil Award, A New York Public Relations Society Big Apple Award, Promax Award for national promotion and a Purpose Award for Disney’s Dreamers Academy. Munroe is a devoted mentor and considers the success of those she has influenced among her greatest professional rewards.

A graduate of the University of Georgia Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, Munroe currently serves on the alumni board of the college. Munroe was a journalist earlier in her career, working as a reporter, producer and news director. She says that she uses her storytelling abilities every day to relate powerful stories about her company, one of the world’s most recognizable entertainment and media brands.

The Pat Tobin Media Professional Award is named for NABJ member Pat Tobin. Tobin passed away in 2008, and was president and CEO of Tobin and Associates, a prominent minority, woman-owned public relations firm based in Los Angeles. She was a dedicated activist for causes that impacted minorities, women and youth. Ms. Munroe’s honor will be presented to her at the association’s Salute to Excellence Gala on August 8th during NABJ’s Annual Convention and Career Fair in Minneapolis.

An advocacy group established in 1975 in Washington, D.C., NABJ is the largest organization for journalists of color in the nation, and provides career development as well as educational and other support to its members worldwide. For additional information visit www.nabj.org.–OnPointPress.net.

Veteran Journalist Dori J. Maynard, NABJ icon of diversity, inclusion, has died

Dori Maynard, icon, pioneer and champion of diversity and inclusion, died at the age of 56.

Dori Maynard, icon, pioneer and champion of diversity and inclusion, has died at the age of 56.

(February 26, 2015) –The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) mourns the loss of Dori J. Maynard, late president of The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education. Maynard died at her home in Oakland, California on Tuesday, February 24. She was 56 years old.

Earlier in her career Ms. Maynard was a reporter at the The Bakersfield Californian, The Patriot Ledger, and the Detroit Free Press. She had led the institute since 2001. The institute originally named the Institute for Journalism Education was later renamed to honor Maynard’s late father Robert in 1993. Maynard’s stepmother the late Nancy Hicks Maynard was the institute’s first president.

Diversity icon Dori Maynard has died.

Diversity icon Dori Maynard has died.

The Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education has continued over the years to fulfill its mission of training journalists and news managers who work to provide thoughtful and inclusive coverage of the communities they serve, create content which embraces the diversity of American society, and serve as a watchdog agency holding the media accountable for the accuracy and fairness of its reporting. It has excelled at doing so with Dori Maynard as the institute’s guiding force.

“Dori fought to ensure that the journalists and newsroom managers responsible for coverage looked like the communities they are responsible for covering,” said NABJ President Bob Butler. “Dori knew that if newsrooms represented the society then journalists would tell stories which are truthful, authentic, and compassionate.”

Maynard’s journalistic acumen and body of work earned her the opportunity to be a part of Harvard University’s prestigious Nieman Fellowship program, a highly selective program allowing journalists to spend a year at Harvard undertaking intensive individualized training and to receive leadership development training. Her selection for the program in 1993 was noteworthy, because it made Maynard and her father, the first father-daughter duo to complete the fellowship.

“Dori was an incredible journalist, and an incredible leader. She was a fierce advocate who was committed to the cause of promoting exceptional journalism at the hands of exceptional talent. Her fierce determination, her focus, her vision, her candor will surely be missed. The journalism community is all the better thanks to Dori’s tremendous contributions. She will be missed,” Butler added.

NABJ offers its sincere condolences to Dori’s family and friends, and to the staff of the Maynard Institute.

An advocacy group established in 1975 in Washington, D.C., NABJ is the largest organization for journalists of color in the nation, and provides career development as well as educational and other support to its members worldwide.–OnPointPress.net.